08
July
2013

Common cold symptoms in children and babies

The common cold waits for no man, woman, child, or baby. Anyone can get the germs and bacteria that lead to a cold. However, the common cold can go away on its own, even with children. It may be unpleasant for a while, but a cold does not necessarily mean a doctor's visit. Check out the symptoms below to know what does and what does not constitute a doctor's visit for your child or baby. If you can recognize the symptoms quickly, you can help them fight the cold easier and quicker.
The common cold waits for no man, woman, child, or baby. Anyone can get the germs and bacteria that lead to a cold. However, the common cold can go away on its own, even with children. It may be unpleasant for a while, but a cold does not necessarily mean a doctor's visit. Check out the symptoms below to know what does and what does not constitute a doctor's visit for your child or baby. If you can recognize the symptoms quickly, you can help them fight the cold easier and quicker.
Common Cold Symptoms for Children
Symptoms for a common cold of course vary from child to child. Your child may sneeze a lot and have a runny nose, but be fine otherwise. Other symptoms include: fatigue, coughing, fever (not always), and sore throat. A cold also can affect childrens' sinuses and ears so they may say that they have a headache or that their ears hurt. They can also have diarrhea or vomiting. As the cold symptoms keep going, mucus will become thicker and darker, often turning a yellow or green color.

It is common for children to develop other infections when they get the common cold. You may not need to take a child to your doctor for a common cold. However, you will want to take them to a doctor if they reach a fever of more than 104 degrees Fahrenheit or 40 degrees Celsius. If they are younger than two years old, the fever should not last more than 24 hours. If they are older than two, you should be concerned if the fever lasts more than three days.

If they do not drink enough liquids or do not pee as often, those could be signs of dehydration and should be taken seriously. Other symptoms to note are: stomach pain, vomiting, severe headaches, constant crying, ear pain, a cough that will not go away, a stiff neck, or unusual sleepiness.
Common Cold Symptoms for Babies
Cold symptoms for babies are a little different than for children. A common cold in newborns can be more serious and so you should consult with your doctor. With younger babies, a common cold can become something more serious quickly. However, even a stuffy nose can be a problem because it can be make it hard to nurse or take a bottle, which can cause dehydration. A baby older than three months might get past the cold without having to see a doctor.

The symptoms of a common cold in a baby are: a runny nose or congestion; yellow or green, thicker mucus; fever of about 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or 38 degrees Celsius; difficulty sleeping; sneezing; coughing; irritability; and decreased appetite.

There are some more serious symptoms for older babies, too: not peeing as much as usual; reaching a temperature higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or 38 degrees Celsius; becoming unusually irritable; has eye discharge of a yellow or green color; or breathes with difficulty. The situation is much more serious if your baby rejects a bottle or fluids, coughs up blood in its phlegm, coughs enough to cause vomiting, or turns blue around the mouth. In these situations, you should call your doctor immediately. 

Keep these symptoms in mind during cold season and you will be able to spot the common cold as it comes up in your children and/or baby.
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Categories: Cold, Infant Health

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